• Homomonument
The Homomonument in Amsterdam has since 1987 commemorated the victims of the persecution of homosexuals worldwide. It also specifically honours the victims of the persecution of homosexuals in National Socialism.
Image: Amsterdam, undated, The monument seen from across the river, University of Tampa Bay, Florida
Amsterdam, undated, The monument seen from across the river, University of Tampa Bay, Florida
Under the National Socialist regime in Germany, gays were deemed criminal and persecuted as such. When the war began, the German authorities also began persecuting homosexuals in the occupied countries. On July 31, 1940, Reich Commissar for the Occupied Netherlands, Arthur Seyß-Inquart, introduced an »enactment against unnatural indecency«. The persecution of gays was entrusted to the Dutch police. However, the police did not complete this task were not systematically, much to the disapproval of the general commissar for administration and the judiciary, higher SS and police leader Hanns Albin Rauter.
The persecution of gays in the occupied Netherlands was never as harsh as in the German Reich, nevertheless, several hundred people were arrested for their actual or alleged homosexuality.
Image: Amsterdam, undated, The monument seen from across the river, University of Tampa Bay, Florida
Amsterdam, undated, The monument seen from across the river, University of Tampa Bay, Florida
It is not possible to quantify the number of victims of the National Socialist persecution of homosexuals in the Netherlands. According to available data, 302 people were tried for »indecency among men« or »indecency with minors of the same sex«. 178 of them were deemed guilty; 131 received prison sentences. Some were admitted into psychiatric facilities. In some cases, gays were deported to concentration camps without trial. It is not known exactly how many homosexuals died in captivity.
Image: Amsterdam, undated, »Past« level, Stiftung Denkmal
Amsterdam, undated, »Past« level, Stiftung Denkmal

Image: Amsterdam, 2000, Homomonument, Menne Vellinga
Amsterdam, 2000, Homomonument, Menne Vellinga
Shortly after the war, there were initiatives to commemorate the victims of the National Socialist persecution of gays by erecting a memorial. They remained without effect – even in the 1970s, flowers which were laid down in public spaces in honour of the gay victims were removed by the police. Also, several discriminating laws remained in force for decades. In 1979, in a time when the gay rights movement grew, the »Homomonument Foundation« was established with the aim of establishing a memorial site. The resulting monument, designed by Dutch artist Karin Daan, was unveiled in 1987 in the old city centre of Amsterdam. It consists of three triangles, which are reminiscent of the pink triangles worn by homosexual prisoners of concentration camps, jointly forming one large triangle. The monument is dedicated to all gays and lesbians to ever have been discriminated on the grounds of their sexual orientation or who have fallen victim to hate crimes. The three elements symbolize the past, the present and the future respectively.
Image: Amsterdam, undated, The platform symbolises the »Future«, Stiftung Denkmal
Amsterdam, undated, The platform symbolises the »Future«, Stiftung Denkmal

Image: Amsterdam, undated, Steps symbloze the »Present«, Stiftung Denkmal
Amsterdam, undated, Steps symbloze the »Present«, Stiftung Denkmal
Name
Homomonument
Address
Keizersgracht Canal, Westermarkt
1016 Amsterdam
Phone
+31 (0)20 606 07 12
Web
http://www.homomonument.nl
E-Mail
info@pinkpoint.org
Open
The monument is accessible at all times.
Possibilities
A memorial ceremony takes place at the monument each year on May 5 – Liberation Day